Category Archives: Theme: Humanities Respond to Crisis (2011-12)

Publishing from Prison

In an invited two-part series on Publication, Terrence Sampson describes the practices of publishing as constrained by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Terrence has been incarcerated since the age of 12, and currently writes from Ramsey Unit in Rosharon, … Continue reading

Posted in Theme: Humanities Respond to Crisis (2011-12), Yearly Theme | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The History of Prison Contract Labor

While we wait for an IPRH  blogger to update us on the spring of the Occupy Movement, here is a fascinating piece on the history of convict labor.  From TomDispatch.com, the blog by Tom Engelhardt,  historians Steve Fraser and Josh … Continue reading

Posted in Theme: Humanities Respond to Crisis (2011-12), Yearly Theme | 2 Comments

What I’ve Learned from Teaching in a Prison by Agnieszka Tuszynska

The Education Justice Project brings UI faculty and graduate students together with  inmates at the Danville Correctional Facility, a state prison in Danville, Illinois in for-credit courses in a broad range of the humanities.  In just a few years,  the … Continue reading

Posted in Theme: Humanities Respond to Crisis (2011-12), Yearly Theme | 6 Comments

Identity Matters: Occupying the New Wisconsin by Anne Pryor

Our latest post is from Anne Pryor, a folklorist and ethnographer from the Wisconsin Arts Board who lives and works in Madison.  Here Anne considers the uses of identity — historical, playful , fictional  — in protest, to make claims … Continue reading

Posted in Theme: Humanities Respond to Crisis (2011-12), Yearly Theme | Leave a comment

Space Matters!

Our latest post is by Katie Walkiewicz,  currently an IPRH fellow and a graduate student in English at UIUC.  Following on Jim Barrett’s recent post on “Their Depression and Ours,” Katie takes up the Occupy Wall Street Movement , a movement, potentially, … Continue reading

Posted in Theme: Humanities Respond to Crisis (2011-12), Yearly Theme | Leave a comment

Their Depression and Ours

Webster’s dictionary defines economic depression  as “low general economic activity marked by mass unemployment, deflation, a low level of investment” and decreasing use of resources.  Whether or not it’s time to use the D-word, with unemployment over 9% nationally by … Continue reading

Posted in Theme: Humanities Respond to Crisis (2011-12), Yearly Theme | Leave a comment

New Theme: Humanities Respond to Crisis

Susan Davis How could the theme for this year’s blog be anything other than crisis? In a respite from the turbulent events of the spring, I was lucky enough to take nearly the whole summer away from headlines.   I lost … Continue reading

Posted in Theme: Humanities Respond to Crisis (2011-12), Yearly Theme | Leave a comment